• OPENING CEREMONY OF THE EXHIBITION

    From Andakulova Gallery
  • OPENING CEREMONY OF THE EXHIBITION

    From Andakulova Gallery
  • OPENING CEREMONY OF THE EXHIBITION

    From Andakulova Gallery

OPENING CEREMONY OF THE EXHIBITION

17 TH NOVEMBER 2016

Andakulova Gallery will host its first all-female exhibition “Neither a shouting match nor a polite droning” and will showcase a selection of different practices of female artists from Central Asia. The exhibition takes its name from an article “Reflections” by a curator Jane Farver, whose primary concern has been “to include the unincluded in the dialogue”. This exhibition will be about pulling together female artists at various stages of their careers and showing how they are all working differently to claim the right to face and to react against the established and cultural traditions.

Our new exhibition will shed more light on Central Asian art that is still almost blank on the art-world map. Andakulova Gallery will bring to the audiences in Dubai an exhibition of female artists whose work reflects the breadth of Central Asia culture twenty years after independence.

Saule Suleimenova (b1970, Almaty, Kazakhstan) undertakes a very personal research of identity where she follows an impulse present in her native land to reinvent itself within the context of its ancient roots, going back to pre-Soviet and even pre-Islamic cultures. Astana Line (2015 -2016) series is about tense relations between a human being and nature, the dissonance between the postcard views of the new capital Astana and the nostalgia for vast steppe spaces and nomadic past. S. Suleimenova works in medium of manipulated photography where she physically combines images sourced from XIX century ethnographic photos with urban graffiti that contain text, scribbles or abstract shape. Her artworks signal the disaccord between the desire to return to the tradition and the realities of current life. Throughout her work S. Suleimenova pinpoints the tension of opposites and pose more questions than answers about her layered view of Kazakh-ness.

GABO (b1969, Almaty, Kazakhstan) creative duet of two identical twin-sisters, Galia and Bota Kusainovs. The sisters, who are deaf since infancy, have been proving throughout their life that deafness is no obstacle to creative people. Galia and Bota have been drawing since they were three years old. Each of them has own, special creative style, but it does not get in the way; vice versa it helps in the sisters’ painting pictures in four hands. They create picturesque graphic pieces on tapestry, batik, ceramics, in embroidery, applique, installations in mixed technique - gouache, pastel, watercolors, gold and silver foil, which makes them more individual and unique in a fairy land, with images of oriental beauties, flowers in rioting colors, rare trees bursting into blossom. The Flower Rhapsody series of work was inspired by their childhood memories when they used to stay at their grandmother’s house in the village with its amazing nature and bright landscapes.

Suinbike Suleimenova (b1992, Almaty, Kazakhstan), the youngest artist in the exhibition. She will also show her art pieces deriving from her everyday interaction with the smartphone. Suinbike uses her own smartphone as her creative tool to disengage with a traditional way of making the art process. Suinbike series “Smartphone Poetry” is an act of unconscious poetry she writes with basic smartphone applications for editing images by adding on texts that she gets from Instagram selfie’s captions or Facebook ‘s status updates. There will be also a video installation “Tragic dances”.

Rimma Gagloeva (b1940, Tskhinvali, North Ossetia) works are all about use of colour and texture where she conveys an emotion that the artist describes as escapism. Like many Central Asian artists, her work is figurative rather than conceptual, something that Gagloeva associates with ancient miniature school, which was based on poetry and music.

Bakhyt Bubicanova (b1985, Aktobe, Kazakhstan) Bakhyt's work draws attention to the cultural change at the time of globalization. Her generation of artists is torn between respect for traditions and adaptation to the Western model. Without nostalgia nor condemnation, her art pieces address the issue of anxieties bound to prompt or undesired mutations as well as violence of the modern industrial societies. Bubicanova is closely interested in the future of the nomadic traditions. Her works are symbolic reminders of a culture that is cutting off its roots, at the risk of losing its identity.